You are not connected. Please login or register

The MOST WONDEROUS "Here's a fact you may not know" thread!

Go to page : 1, 2, 3  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down  Message [Page 1 of 3]

El Frog

avatar
Admin
INDEED!

This thread is dedicated to the ideal that we, as CoGers are capable of coming out with wonderous facts that most people don't know! The thread is open to all members to bring facts to the membership as a whole. Let's see what you can come up with!


Here's an interesting one from the world of archery: I am sure that many of you know that the chap who makes bows is called a Bowyer, and the one who attaches the fletchings (feathers) to an arrow shaft is a Fletcher, but did you know that the person who casts the arrow head (also called a barb) is an Arrowsmith? My personal favourite is the professional title of the person who winds the string for the bows: he is a Stringfellow!


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk

RedCleft!

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
Another name for a Microsoft Windows tutorial is ''Crash Course''.

I did know a family with the sir name Stringfellow. Last I recall, I was the one shooting them with my backyard bow..

View user profile http://redoctoberrct3.webs.com

El Frog

avatar
Admin
I challenged Hears last night to come up with one, but it appears that he has failed to do so!

Yet another archery-based one for you:

I'm sure that many of you have heard the tale of Robin Hood in one form or another, but did you know what colour hose or leggings they would have worn?

Anyone who said "Lincoln Green" is wrong! The original version, The Ballade Of Robin Hode, states that they wore hose of Lincoln Graen which is actually scarlet! Lincoln was the centre of cloth dying in England, and they were most famous for the above mentioned deep red. In fact, the story may have been written by the Guilds as it mentions clothing, colours and fashions quite a lot as well as hammering home the idea of bands of men (the Guilds) having power over the wealthy and restoring happiness to the country.

In addition, the character of Friar Tuck was added much later, probably around 1600.


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk

Get.Creative

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
My grandad used to work as a clock maker in London. During the war, one of the hands for Big Ben was damaged, and it needed replacing. My grandad made a new hand, went up Big Ben and replaced the old one. It was the minute hand which looks over the houses of parliment.

View user profile

wagi

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
That cashew nuts aren't really nuts, they are the dried and salted seeds of the caju fruit, which is a native of Brazil. The ripe fruit is somewhat shaped like an up-side-down apple or bell pepper which is red, pink or yellow, and contains a really delicious juice. From the bottom is attached a smaller kidney-shaped part that contains the seed. They are now grown around the globe in tropical climes.



View user profile

El Frog

avatar
Admin
When the very first (stuffed) Duckbilled Platypus was brought back to England by scientists in the late 19th Century, it was claimed by many professors to be a fake, merely a swan's beak sewn onto a beaver!


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk

The Heth

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
El Frog wrote:When the very first (stuffed) Duckbilled Platypus was brought back to England by scientists in the late 19th Century, it was claimed by many professors to be a fake, merely a swan's beak sewn onto a beaver!

How very interesting, didn't know that!

I know that some scientists made a fake mermaid baby in Victorian era by stitching a skinned monkey to the tail end of a small shark...eww

Elephants can't jump, or walk backwards, they just can't get their heads, and legs, around moving in reverse.

View user profile

El Frog

avatar
Admin
I'm sure we've all heard of cobbled roads (which were used exclusively in the wealthiest areas), and also that in times of civil unrest, the unhappiest malcontents would pull up these rounded, hand-sized stones for the purpose of lobbing them, but did you know that the next stage in road evolution was to crush the stones into small, tightly compacted and unthrowable highways? This process was called metalising and was invented as much to stop the wealthy being pelted as it was to make coach journeys comfortable!

The Duke of Wellington - while a most excellent tactician and general - was a truly terrible Prime Minister, and was nicknamed "The Iron Duke" because of the iron screens he had to have fitted to his coach so he could avoid stoning!

On related note, in 1840 Mr MacAdam came up with the idea of applying tar to the metalised roads to keep the stones in place for longer. It wasn't until 1901 that this process was called "Tarmacadaming" and the mixture called "Tarmac".


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk
There are no rivers in Saudi Arabia!

View user profile

Andrew

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
A common occurrence noticed is that there are a lot of Italians named Tony. This is in fact a nickname given to them. When a large number of Italians immigrated into the U.S., mostly through Ellis Island,they would stamp To N.Y. (New York) on their head. They soon just called them 'Tony'. When they picked their 'American name' a lot of them used said nickname, and it has stuck ever since.

View user profile

El Frog

avatar
Admin
There are a number of very old laws that are ludicrous today. Every now and again, some fool with state how "a Welshman found within the city walls of Gloucester after sunset may be shot with a longbow" or that "it is still legal to herd geese through the streets of London", but it simply isn't true. There is a small organisation whose purpose is to remove such antiquated laws from the statutes. Other notable examples that have been made to go away include being executed (in the UK) for treason, and also the related "burning ships in her majesty's docks".

But here(s) are a few laws from around the world that you might not be aware of:


- In Miami, it is illegal to skateboard inside a police station!

- It is illegal to die while in the Houses of Parliament. Sometimes it is impossible to tell whether members of the House of Lords are dead or alive though!

- Ohio state law informs us that it is illegal to get a fish drunk!

- Alabama felt it necessary to pass a law banning the riding of a motorbike while wearing a blindfold.

- We Brits are a health conscious lot, so we have a law that means you would be breaking the law if you attempted to hire a taxi when you have the plague!

- San Salvador takes a dim view of driving while drunk. In fact, it is possible to receive a sentence of being executed by firing squad for this offence!

- Women living in Vermont must get written permission from their husbands before they can wear false teeth!

- French farmers can be a militant lot, but noone living in France is allowed to name a pig "Napoleon".

- In Kentucky, it is illegal (and to my mind, extremely difficult) to carry a concealed weapon that is more than six foot long!

- And back in Florida, unmarried women who parachute (or possibly skydive - it isn't clear) on Sundays face being jailed for this offence!


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk

Gravity

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
I am eating cake right now.

Fact.

View user profile

rainbowwarrior

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
The breakdance move known as the Windmill was created by accident.

View user profile
rainbowwarrior wrote:The breakdance move known as the Windmill was created by accident.

So was JamesB, as a matter of fact!

View user profile

El Frog

avatar
Admin
American flags are well known for their flammable qualities, but who burns the most American flags?

Iranians?

NO! The scout association of America! When flags become dirty, frayed and generally less than perfect, they must be disposed of, and the "most noble" way of doing this is considered burning! The scouts must get through a LOT of flags!


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk

baz6174

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
Nicole Kidman is terrified of butterflies.

View user profile

RedCleft!

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
A Lion and A Tiger = a Liger

A liger looks like a giant lion with diffused stripes and some male ligers grow sparse manes. These massive creatures are 10 feet long on average and weigh about 700 lb (320kg). Liger love swimming - trait common to tigers but lacking in lions. Ligers have been bred in captivity, deliberately and accidentally, since shortly before World War II. The largest liger alive today is appropriately named Hercules and lives in Jungle Island in Miami.

From the world of Sci Fi, (including such things as halo, avatar, the matrix ect...) exoskeletons are now a reality, whilst they dont look as smexy, its still very interesting

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1295920/Robotic-exoskeleton-soldiers.html

View user profile http://redoctoberrct3.webs.com
Alice Cooper's original bandmates live happily off of his yearly payments to use his stage name!

View user profile

El Frog

avatar
Admin
While the United Kingdom was busy fighting the Nazis in 1940, it became necessary for them to purchase ships from America. At this point (apparently unknown to the Prime Minister) America was neutral, and, in fact, supplying arms and equipment to England and Germany!

Anyway, back to the ships! America supplied 50 derelict ships that were actually on their way to the scrapyard. What people don't know is that the price paid was SO high that England only finished paying the debt for them in 2008!


...but this story is full of twists! The very first time one of these ships was used on an exercise, something terrible went wrong. While loaded with sailors and troops on manoeuvres in Scottish waters, the ship exploded, killing all on board. Although this was covered up at the time to avoid a drop in troop morale, it has since been revealed that Naval Intelligence wrote letters to the families of the deceased, giving false reasons for the deaths.

Ever heard the story of a British officer drifting ashore with plans for an apparent invasion in his pocket? It has been used in films (such as "The Man That Never Was"), but surprisingly, the story is actually true. In an attempt to trick the Nazis, Naval Intelligence took a corpse, faked I.D. papers (as Acting Major William Martin of the Royal Marines), photos of his fictional sweetheart, "Pam", and most importantly, documents of a plan to invade Greece, then set him adrift in a dinghy off the coast of Spain. To cut a long story short, the Nazis believed this trick and moved troops and tanks to reinforce their divisions in Greece...

...not realizing that it was all a ruse because the Allies were about to invade Sicily instead!

Although it was claimed that the body was of a Welsh soldier who had committed suicide, Lt. Cmdr. Ewen Montagu of Naval Intelligence admitted in his published memoirs that the corpse was actually that of one of the sailors killed in Scotland when the aforementioned boat exploded! Whether this is actually true or not may never be known.

As a footnote, it is claimed that the idea for this ruse, called Operation Mincemeat, came from Ian Flemming, author of the James Bond books.


Look it up; it's a fascinating story!


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk

Andrew

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
I'll go with a short fact. Ever wonder why those migrating people were termed a 'hobo'? It's really a shortened version of the original term, Homeward Bound

View user profile

The Heth

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
Ahhhh, I do love the lists of silly laws. Always make my day Smile

View user profile

Andrew

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
January 15, 1919, Boston, Massachusetts. A 2,000,000 gallon of molasses sat in a warehouse for a distilling company. Due to sugar's high price, molasses was the sweetener of choice back then. The molasses built up so much CO2 from the heat of the sun, it exploded. Unleashing a 15 foot tall wave, which moved at the fast pace of 35 mph. It destroyed many buildings, and even lifted trains off their tracks. It killed 21, and injured 150. For quite some time after, the area was dyed a brown color. Some say you can still smell the molasses on a hot day.

View user profile

El Frog

avatar
Admin
For the 18th Century British sailor, one of the best parts of his wage was his rum allowance. Despite the obvious dangers of drunken sailors (and what to do with them apart from singing songs about them), British Naval Regulations of 1756 required every sailor to be given approximately half a pint of the stuff per day - and before rum became the drink of choice, a gallon of beer per day!

There is a major problem for all seafarers, and that is clean, drinkable water. Although casks of the stuff were always taken aboard at every port, horrid algaes would make the contents slimy and generally stale. However, it was discovered that adding beer or wine to water meant that water could be kept lovely and fresh for longer - or at least, covered up the unpleasant taste of algae! Admiral Edward Vernon decided that he really didn't have time or room for barrels of wine, water AND rum on his ships, so he decided simply to scrap the wine (which didn't fare too well from all of the movement of the rolling waves) and mix the rum and water together. While his crews initially objected, they soon grew to enjoy the new drink as it wasn't so harsh (being softened by the water) and also lasted much longer as Vernon's "recipe" made their allowance four times larger.

Vernon wasn't totally happy with the taste, so a small amount of citrus fruit juice was added to the mixture. Little did they understand that this move was enough to keep the Jack Tars healthy - far healthier than foreign navies. The juice, high in Vitamin C, kept away such nasty diseases as scurvy and meant that the British Royal Navy was able to dominate the oceans. After some years, the secret drink became common knowledge, and in an attempt to stall Britain's naval dominance, many nations refused to supply lemons, keeping them all for their own navies. Britain replaced the lemon with limes, which (it is believed) is the reason why Brits abroad are sometimes referred to as "Limeys".

These days, Vernon has faded into obscurity, but his nickname lives on. He was famous for wearing a long cloak made of grogham fabric (a thick, coarse wool affair), and became known as "Old Grog" for that reason. As a tribute, his drink was called Grog!


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk

Andrew

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
A lot of names/words can have their origins traced back to the slaughtering of another language. Such as the horseradish. The Germans called the horseradish 'meerrettich' or sea radish, since it was commonly found by the sea. When the English saw this they thought 'mareradish', which slowly became 'horseradish' as we know it today.

View user profile

El Frog

avatar
Admin
Andrew wrote:A lot of names/words can have their origins traced back to the slaughtering of another language. Such as the horseradish. The Germans called the horseradish 'meerrettich' or sea radish, since it was commonly found by the sea. When the English saw this they thought 'mareradish', which slowly became 'horseradish' as we know it today.

This is a more dangerous plant than you can imagine! It looks very similar to Aconite (also called Wolfsbane).....which just happens to be deadly poisonous to the humanfolk! Somewhere in the region of 100 people per year die from choosing the wrong plant to season their meals with!


While on the subject of plants, Asparagus was originally known as "Sparrow Grass" in the UK.


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk

El Frog

avatar
Admin
As Charles Dickens regularly comments, the Victorians spent a lot of time and effort in the pursuit of money, often at the expense of others. Many banks and businesses kept vast ledgers filled with accounts for the various debts they were owed. If a debtor was unable to make a payment (and the bank/business didn't simply repossess his property), a large question mark would be written in red ink next to his name. This was called "Querying". Being Queried was bad news; you would never be loaned money again, all of your property was at risk, bands of bailiffs may be employed to beat you (or kill you as an example to others) or you could spend the rest of your life in Debtors Prison. Regardless of what steps were taken, you would still be expected to pay your debt!

Those who were Queried were given the nickname of "Queer" and colloquially described as "living on Queer Street".


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk

Andrew

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
One expression that has always confused me is "case in point". Why, it would make much more sense to have a point in your case. The expression comes from a French term "a point", meaning to be relevant. The French term eventually worked itself down to the English term "in point". With precedents, some lawyers argued that cases must turn up in order to show relevance, or case in relevance(point).

View user profile

El Frog

avatar
Admin
The Welsh for "ironing board" is Bord Smoothio!


_____________________________________________
View user profile http://www.fellowshipoftheox.co.uk

The Heth

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
/\ Hahahaha nice

Despite its regular occurance, a sneeze can actually be fatal. Given the intensity and sudden nature of the contractions to make one sneeze, it is possible for it to severely damage the spine.

View user profile

RedCleft!

avatar
I am beloved of the Guac!
iratA does not deserve the arguing donkey...

View user profile http://redoctoberrct3.webs.com

Sponsored content


View previous topic View next topic Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 3]

Go to page : 1, 2, 3  Next

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum